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New Law Requires All Individuals Who Refuse To Submit To A BAC Test To Install An Interlock Device In Their Vehicle

Posted by William Young | Jan 08, 2019 | 0 Comments

It does not matter if the individual is convicted of a DUI - Even if they are found "not-guilty" or is never prosecuted for a DUI, the interlock device will be required.

All first time DUI offenders and those individuals who refuse to take a roadside test for alcohol or drugs will be required to install an interlock device on any vehicle they plan to drive. An interlock device requires the operator to blow into the system before the vehicle will function; if the device finds alcohol in the driver's system the vehicle will not function. Previously, individual judges had the discretion to decide if an interlock device was necessary on a case-by-case basis. For the most part, this meant that interlock devices were only required for repeat offenders.

About the Author

William Young

Idaho Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation Attorney. Although I do a little bit of everything in my practice, I focus primarily on Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation. I am licensed to practice, and have a record of success, in both state and federal court.

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