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Your Rights and Responsibilities When Dealing With Law Enforcement

Posted by William Young | Sep 18, 2017 | 0 Comments

YOUR RIGHTS

  • You have the right to remain silent. If you wish to exercise that right, say so out loud.
  • You have the right to refuse to consent to a search of yourself, your car or your home.
  • If you are not under arrest, you have the right to calmly leave.
  • You have the right to a lawyer if you are arrested. Ask for one immediately.

YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Stay calm and be polite.
  • Do not interfere with or obstruct the police.
  • Do not lie or give false documents.
  • Prepare yourself and your family in case you are arrested.
  • Remember the details of the encounter.
  • Do not resist law enforcement even if you feel that your rights are being violated. File a written complaint or call a local attorney after the encounter.

About the Author

William Young

Idaho Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation Attorney. Although I do a little bit of everything in my practice, I focus primarily on Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation. I am licensed to practice, and have a record of success, in both state and federal court.

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